Northern New York Newspapers
Watertown
Ogdensburg
Massena-Potsdam
Lowville
Carthage
Malone
NNY Business
NNY Living
NNY Ads
Sun., Feb. 1
ADVERTISE SUBSCRIBE
Serving the communities of Jefferson, St. Lawrence and Lewis counties, New York
In print daily. Online always.
Related Stories

Seaway officials applaud new Coast Guard ballast rules

PREV
NEXT
ARTICLE OPTIONS
A A
print this article
e-mail this article

St. Lawrence Seaway officials on Monday applauded the U.S. Coast Guard’s final ballast water treatment regulation, a stark contrast to the heavy criticism the rule received last week from area environmentalists.

“The rule not only provides robust protection for the environment, but also preserves the 227,000 jobs that depend on maritime commerce in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway system,” St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. spokeswoman Nancy T. Alcalde said in a news release.

Upon its announcement Friday, the new ballast rule was attacked by groups such as Save the River, Clayton, for adopting the International Maritime Organization’s “weak” ballast discharge standards.

Ballast is water carried in tanks to stabilize ocean vessels in transit.

Ships entering U.S. waters are required now only to flush or rinse these tanks at sea, but the Coast Guard’s new rule would have ship operators install water management systems that would kill living organisms in ballast tanks with ultraviolet radiation or Coast Guard-approved chemicals, among other treatment options.

The state of New York had adopted and then backed away from a set of rules that proposed living organism limits 100 times or 1,000 times more stringent than the IMO standards.

Along with the shipping industry and the Canadian government, the Seaway for years has fought New York’s tough, “scientifically unachievable” ballast rules in favor of a more “reasonable” discharge limit.

However, Jennifer J. Caddick, head of Save the River, has argued that the weaker IMO standards simply do not provide the protection needed to keep foreign invasive species out of the Great Lakes and that the real problem is the shipping industry’s unwillingness to invest in the costly, high-tech treatment systems.

Commenting rules:
  1. Stick to the topic of the article/letter/editorial.
  2. When responding to issues raised by other commenters, do not engage in personal attacks or name-calling.
  3. Comments that include profanity/obscenities or are libelous in nature will be removed without warning.
Violators' commenting privileges may be revoked indefinitely. By commenting you agree to our full Terms of Use.
Giveaway
Syracuse Football Tickets Giveaway
Connect with Us
WDT News FeedsWDT on FacebookWDT on TwitterWDT on InstagramWDT for iOS: iPad, iPhone, and iPod touchWDT for Android
Showcase of Homes
Showcase of Homes