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Franklin County Legislature race in Bombay, Brushton a rematch from 2010 election

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BOMBAY - Franklin County Legislator Sue Robideau, R-Brushton, is being challenged by former Bombay Supervisor Don Dabiew for the Legislature’s District 5 seat in a repeat of the 2010.

Ms. Robideau, a 62-year-old Republican, says she now works full time as ta county legislator. She retired from the Department of Social Services after 30 years of service and is a Brushton-Moira Central School graduate.

Mr. Dabiew, a 58-year-old Democrat, is currently the co-owner and landlord of the apartments and businesses in the old Brushton school.

He was also the 20-year owner of Dabiew’s Market and is retired from General Motors.

Mr. Dabiew’s experience with politics has mainly been focused in Bombay.

He was the Bombay supervisor for three years and spent five years as a town councilman in Bombay.

He has been a member of the Franklin County Industrial Development Agencies for three years and is currently serving as treasurer of Franklin County Association of Senior Citizens.

Why they are running

“I’ve always enjoyed working with people,” Ms. Robideau said. “That’s why I worked in human services. I want to find any way possible to make a difference in Franklin County.”

However, she noted that any accomplishments she has made in Franklin County have not been done alone.

“My theory is to work together as a team,” she said.

Robideau said she has an understanding of a wide variety of issues and that she works effectively “with individuals, businesses, nonprofit organizations, local government and people all parties.”

“It takes people willing to work together ... I will try to represent the people to the best of my ability,” Robideau said.

She said one major highlight during her term on the Franklin County Legislature is that the county was able to stay under the state-imposed 2 percent tax cap.

“The [tax levy] increase in 2012 was 1.98 percent and this year it was 1.91 percent,” Ms. Robideau said. “That to me is a highlight when the county was faced with unfunded mandates from the state.”

Robideau said if re-elected, she will continue to work on the land claims for the town of Bombay.

The St. Regis Mohawk Tribe is looking to claim land known as the Bombay Triangle area.

Census data in 2000 showed a 75.7 percent nonreservation Indian population in the land in the Bombay Triangle.

If the tribe is successful in its claim, residents of the land in question would fall under reservation jurisdiction. Any land sales to the reservation must be made willingly.

“The Bombay supervisor and the council people have some ideas as to what to do,” she said. “Twenty-five acres, that’s a large chunk of land.”

However, she said there will be further discussions on the matter.

Ms. Robideau also said she wanted to continue to work on keeping the Malone Veterans Affairs Community Based Outpatient Clinic from closing at the end of February.

“A lot of them can’t drive to places like Saranac Lake,” the site of the nearest VA facility outisde of Malone, Robideau said.

She also said she also wants to continue to work with the residents and the staff at the Franklin County nursing home. Recently, the county agreed to consolidate the county-run nursing home with a facility operated by the Alice Hyde Medical Center.

“I want to make it as smooth as a transition as possible,” Ms. Robideau said.

Mr. Dabiew said if he was elected to the three-year position he would try to attend at least one meeting per town he represents each year.

“I would be [there] to support [them] as much as possible,” Mr. Dabiew said. “I feel I should be supporting the towns.”

“One thing I’d like to do is to make better communication between the legislature and the towns and all the different departments in the towns,” he said.

Mr. Dabiew, a lifelong resident of Franklin County, said he would communicate with county employees to discuss how their job could be done more efficiently, moves that could reduce costs in the long run.

“The people that know their job may know a better way to do the job,” Mr. Dabiew said.

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